Articles

Mariahadessa Ekere Tallie etallie

Mariahadessa Ekere Tallie etallie

   

ChickenBones: A Journal

for  Literary & Artistic African-American  Themes

   

Home     

  www.nathanielturner.com

I see these men not as men / but as terrorists in training camouflaged bombers on / the ground floor of truth

 

 ]]>

Forced Entry

By  Ekere Tallie

He broke into me stole something a brazen thief never charged with forced entry because “Please don’t” didn’t lead to blue black marks on the lock and no one sees the bruise prints the scratch marks on my spirit these don’t make police reports the dignity missing from my step doesn’t qualify as physical evidence I shake when I see him only my homegirls seem to notice their golden light, protective around me his boys’ mantra is “lying bitch” they mutter it with sharp machete eyes, occasionally someone rouses himself to say it- “Lying bitch” the words weigh down the wings of airborne birds and for the first time I see these men not as men but as terrorists in training camouflaged bombers on the ground floor of truth taking dynamite to its foundation. I see myself as a prisoner of war an exile a survivor I wish this wasn’t my story but it is a million times over and just when I think it has gone away it reappears at my doorstep in another woman’s face or on the ten o’clock news and although I have loved men since maybe another sister can’t so this is our story and it will be ours until we don’t have to claim it anymore until women from Brooklyn to Oakland to South Africa can sit back in amazement and say “I can’t believe such things ever occurred,” until the word “rape” can be wiped out from vocabularies removed from the dictionary stamped out of our memories until then, this will be our story and wounded eyes will tell it even when we don’t

*   *   *   *   *

 

Karma’s Footsteps

By Mariahadessa Ekere Tallie

Somebody has to tell the truth sometime, whatever that truth may be. In this, her début full collection, Mariahadessa Ekere Tallie offers up a body of work that bears its scars proudly, firm in the knowledge that each is evidence of a wound survived. These are songs of life in all its violent difficulty and beauty; songs of fury, songs of love. ‘Karma’s Footsteps’ brims with things that must be said and turns the volume up, loud, giving silence its last rites. “Ekere Tallie’s new work ‘Karma’s Footsteps’ is as fierce with fight songs as it is with love songs. Searing with truths from the modern day world she is unafraid of the twelve foot waves that such honesties always manifest. A poet who “refuses to tiptoe” she enters and exits the page sometimes with short concise imagery, sometimes in the arms of delicate memoir. Her words pull the forgotten among us back into the lightning of our eyes.—Nikky Finney / 

Ekere Tallie Table  / I Leave My Colors Everywhere

ChickenBones Black Arts and Black Power Figures (Compiled by Rudolph Lewis)    

*   *   *   *   *

“Love is a story that we never stop telling” Veronique Tadjo   http://www.ekeretallie.com

*   *   *   *   *

“More than a guide to a holistic, healthy pregnancy; it’s a confessional, a warning, and a roadmap for navigating the rewarding, relentless terrain of motherhood.” No, it is not for the faint-hearted. But if you are a mom, have friends who are new or expectant mothers, or if you work with pregnant women, this is 33 pages of advice that most of us never got about motherhood.   And while you’re visiting, do look around. We’ve added an audio file of me reading my piece from the anthology, Go, Tell Michelle, a new mothertongue piece, and links to new poems.   Hope you enjoy all the new offerings. one love, ekere   PS: Please spread the word  Mother Nature 33 pages $8

Mother Nature: Thoughts on Nourishing Your Body, Mind, and Spirit During Pregnancy and Beyond  www.ekeretallie.com

*   *   *   *   *

The Bembe

                   By Mariahadessa Ekere Tallie

 

Chorus of city dwellers fanning ourselves In a basement Boasting tropical heat Water of shekere Randy pours the rum Of his voice into the thirsty Ear of Oggun Tree and animal speak again When Baba’s hands Translate scripture to rhythm Agogo unravels a thin Veil between us And the unseen The unsuspecting basement becomes dizzy with praise giddy with movement,

this moment echoes itself. Echoes itself across land and water happens simultaneously in a far flung living room, a courtyard where greetings are exchanged in Patois or Potuguese, where abichuelas y arroz are heaped on paper plates, where dark hands wrapped brown spirits around tired shoulders and did away with slavery, where family was broken dragged away to begin the journey this exact moment happens.

A remembering solid and present as smooth river stones in rebellious bellies in these rooms swirling with white cloth and song we become a river reaching back to cleanse ourselves.

Mariahadessa Ekere Tallie is a mother, poet, educator, and performer who is studying the healing power of herbs. Her first book of poetry Karma’s Footsteps was published by Flipped Eye Press last year. Her work has also been published in the anthologies Listen Up!, Catch The Fire, Role Call, Beyond The Frontier, Bum Rush the Page and Revenge and Forgiveness.

Source: oyansoro

*   *   *   *   *

AALBC.com’s 25 Best Selling Books

 

Fiction

#1 – Justify My Thug by Wahida Clark #2 – Flyy Girl by Omar Tyree #3 – Head Bangers: An APF Sexcapade by Zane #4 – Life Is Short But Wide by J. California Cooper #5 – Stackin’ Paper 2 Genesis’ Payback by Joy King #6 – Thug Lovin’ (Thug 4) by Wahida Clark #7 – When I Get Where I’m Going by Cheryl Robinson #8 – Casting the First Stone by Kimberla Lawson Roby #9 – The Sex Chronicles: Shattering the Myth by Zane

#10 – Covenant: A Thriller  by Brandon Massey

#11 – Diary Of A Street Diva  by Ashley and JaQuavis

#12 – Don’t Ever Tell  by Brandon Massey

#13 – For colored girls who have considered suicide  by Ntozake Shange

#14 – For the Love of Money : A Novel by Omar Tyree

#15 – Homemade Loves  by J. California Cooper

#16 – The Future Has a Past: Stories by J. California Cooper

#17 – Player Haters by Carl Weber

#18 – Purple Panties: An Eroticanoir.com Anthology by Sidney Molare

#19 – Stackin’ Paper by Joy King

#20 – Children of the Street: An Inspector Darko Dawson Mystery by Kwei Quartey

#21 – The Upper Room by Mary Monroe

#22 – Thug Matrimony  by Wahida Clark

#23 – Thugs And The Women Who Love Them by Wahida Clark

#24 – Married Men by Carl Weber

#25 – I Dreamt I Was in Heaven – The Rampage of the Rufus Buck Gang by Leonce Gaiter

Non-fiction

#1 – Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention by Manning Marable #2 – Confessions of a Video Vixen by Karrine Steffans #3 – Dear G-Spot: Straight Talk About Sex and Love by Zane #4 – Letters to a Young Brother: MANifest Your Destiny by Hill Harper #5 – Peace from Broken Pieces: How to Get Through What You’re Going Through by Iyanla Vanzant #6 – Selected Writings and Speeches of Marcus Garvey by Marcus Garvey #7 – The Ebony Cookbook: A Date with a Dish by Freda DeKnight #8 – The Isis Papers: The Keys to the Colors by Frances Cress Welsing #9 – The Mis-Education of the Negro by Carter Godwin Woodson

#10 – John Henrik Clarke and the Power of Africana History  by Ahati N. N. Toure

#11 – Fail Up: 20 Lessons on Building Success from Failure by Tavis Smiley

#12 –The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander

#13 – The Black Male Handbook: A Blueprint for Life by Kevin Powell

#14 – The Other Wes Moore: One Name, Two Fates by Wes Moore

#15 – Why Men Fear Marriage: The Surprising Truth Behind Why So Many Men Can’t Commit  by RM Johnson

#16 – Black Titan: A.G. Gaston and the Making of a Black American Millionaire by Carol Jenkins

#17 – Brainwashed: Challenging the Myth of Black Inferiority by Tom Burrell

#18 – A New Earth: Awakening to Your Life’s Purpose by Eckhart Tolle

#19 – John Oliver Killens: A Life of Black Literary Activism by Keith Gilyard

#20 – Alain L. Locke: The Biography of a Philosopher by Leonard Harris

#21 – Age Ain’t Nothing but a Number: Black Women Explore Midlife by Carleen Brice

#22 – 2012 Guide to Literary Agents by Chuck Sambuchino #23 – Chicken Soup for the Prisoner’s Soul by Tom Lagana #24 – 101 Things Every Boy/Young Man of Color Should Know by LaMarr Darnell Shields

#25 – Beyond the Black Lady: Sexuality and the New African American Middle Class  by Lisa B. Thompson

*   *   *   *   *

Lost Prophet: The Life and Times of Bayard Rustin

By John D’Emilio

Bayard Rustin is one of the most important figures in the history of the American civil rights movement. Before Martin Luther King, before Malcolm X, Bayard Rustin was working to bring the cause to the forefront of America’s consciousness. A teacher to King, an international apostle of peace, and the organizer of the famous 1963 March on Washington, he brought Gandhi’s philosophy of nonviolence to America and helped launch the civil rights movement. Nonetheless, Rustin has been largely erased by history, in part because he was an African American homosexual. Acclaimed historian John D’Emilio tells the full and remarkable story of Rustin’s intertwined lives: his pioneering and public person and his oblique and stigmatized private self.

It was in the tumultuous 1930s that Bayard Rustin came of age, getting his first lessons in politics through the Communist Party and the unrest of the Great Depression.

A Quaker and a radical pacifist, he went to prison for refusing to serve in World War II, only to suffer a sexual scandal. His mentor, the great pacifist A. J. Muste, wrote to him, “You were capable of making the ‘mistake’ of thinking that you could be the leader in a revolution…at the same time that you were a weakling in an extreme degree and engaged in practices for which there was no justification.”

*   *   *   *   *

To the Mountaintop

My Journey Through the Civil Rights Movement

By Charlayne Hunter-Gault

A personal history of the civil rights movement from activist and acclaimed journalist Charlayne Hunter-Gault. On January 20, 2009, 1.8 million people crowded the grounds of the Capitol to witness the inauguration of Barack Obama. Among the masses was Charlayne Hunter-Gault. She had flown from South Africa for the occasion, to witness what was for many the culmination of the long struggle for civil rights in the United States. In this compelling personal history, she uses the event to look back on her own involvement in the civil rights movement, as one of two black students who forced the University of Georgia to integrate, and to relate the pivotal events that swept the South as the movement gathered momentum through the early 1960s. With poignant black-and-white photos, original articles from the New York Times, and a unique personal viewpoint, this is a moving tribute to the men and women on whose shoulders Obama stood.

*   *   *   *   *

 

Jefferson’s Pillow

The Founding Fathers and the Dilemma of Black Patriotism

By Roger W. Wilkins

 In Jefferson’s Pillow, Wilkins returns to America’s beginnings and the founding fathers who preached and fought for freedom, even though they owned other human beings and legally denied them their humanity. He asserts that the mythic accounts of the American Revolution have ignored slavery and oversimplified history until the heroes, be they the founders or the slaves in their service, are denied any human complexity. Wilkins offers a thoughtful analysis of this fundamental paradox through his exploration of the lives of George Washington, George Mason, James Madison, and of course Thomas Jefferson. He discusses how class, education, and personality allowed for the institution of slavery, unravels how we as Americans tell different sides of that story, and explores the confounding ability of that narrative to limit who we are and who we can become. An important intellectual history of America’s founding, Jefferson’s Pillow will change the way we view our nation and ourselves.

*   *   *   *   *

The White Masters of the World

From The World and Africa, 1965

By W. E. B. Du Bois

W. E. B. Du Bois’ Arraignment and Indictment of White Civilization (Fletcher)

*   *   *   *   *

Ancient African Nations

*   *   *   *   *

If you like this page consider making a donation

online through PayPal

*   *   *   *   *

Negro Digest / Black World

Browse all issues

1950        1960        1965        1970        1975        1980        1985        1990        1995        2000 ____ 2005        

Enjoy!

*   *   *   *   *

The Death of Emmett Till by Bob Dylan  The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll  Only a Pawn in Their Game

Rev. Jesse Lee Peterson Thanks America for Slavery /

George Jackson  / Hurricane Carter

*   *   *   *   *

The Journal of Negro History issues at Project Gutenberg

The Haitian Declaration of Independence 1804  / January 1, 1804 — The Founding of Haiti 

*   *   *   *   *

   

*   *   *   *   *

(Books, DVDs, Music)

 

 

 

 

update 19 June 2012

  ]]>

 ]]>

 

Home  Ekere Tallie Table

Post Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.