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Big Easy Blues

Big Easy Blues

   

ChickenBones: A Journal

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St. Peter when you see her, / wont you take my baby’s hand?

St. Peter when you see her, / wont you take my baby’s hand?

Please tell her that I love her, that I’ll always be her man.

 

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Big Easy Blues

By Amin Sharif 

They call it the Big Easy

but it ain’t easy anymore,

They call it the Big Easy

but it ain’t easy anymore.

I’m feelin’ lost and so forsaken

and my soul can’t bear much more.

 

The only one I ever loved

has been gone and swept away,

The only one I ever loved

has been gone and swept away.

The Mississippi is her graveyard,

there she’ll be ‘til Judgment Day.

 

That old muddy river’s rollin’

right above my baby’s head.

That old muddy river’s rollin’

right above my baby’s head.

Yesterday, I kissed her lips,

But now today my baby’s dead.

 

Oh Lord, can you tell me

what am I suppose to do?

Oh Lord, can you tell me

what I am suppose to do?

See without my baby’s lovin’ ways,

I feel like I am drowning, too.

 

St. Peter when you see her,

wont you take my baby’s hand?

St. Peter when you see her,

wont you take my baby’s hand?

Please tell her that I love her,

that I’ll always be her man.

 

They call it the Big Easy

but it ain’t easy anymore.

They call it the Big Easy

but it ain’t easy anymore.

I’m feelin lost and so forsaken,

And my soul can’t bear much more.

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posted 8 September 2005

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Blacks in Hispanic Literature: Critical Essays

Edited by Miriam DeCosta-Willis 

Blacks in Hispanic Literature is a collection of fourteen essays by scholars and creative writers from Africa and the Americas. Called one of two significant critical works on Afro-Hispanic literature to appear in the late 1970s, it includes the pioneering studies of Carter G. Woodson and Valaurez B. Spratlin, published in the 1930s, as well as the essays of scholars whose interpretations were shaped by the Black aesthetic. The early essays, primarily of the Black-as-subject in Spanish medieval and Golden Age literature, provide an historical context for understanding 20th-century creative works by African-descended, Hispanophone writers, such as Cuban Nicolás Guillén and Ecuadorean poet, novelist, and scholar Adalberto Ortiz, whose essay analyzes the significance of Negritude in Latin America. This collaborative text set the tone for later conferences in which writers and scholars worked together to promote, disseminate, and critique the literature of Spanish-speaking people of African descent. . . . Cited by a literary critic in 2004 as “the seminal study in the field of Afro-Hispanic Literature . . . on which most scholars in the field ‘cut their teeth’.”

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Sister Citizen: Shame, Stereotypes, and Black Women in America

By Melissa V. Harris-Perry

According to the author, this society has historically exerted considerable pressure on black females to fit into one of a handful of stereotypes, primarily, the Mammy, the Matriarch or the Jezebel.  The selfless Mammy’s behavior is marked by a slavish devotion to white folks’ domestic concerns, often at the expense of those of her own family’s needs. By contrast, the relatively-hedonistic Jezebel is a sexually-insatiable temptress. And the Matriarch is generally thought of as an emasculating figure who denigrates black men, ala the characters Sapphire and Aunt Esther on the television shows Amos and Andy and Sanford and Son, respectively.     

Professor Perry points out how the propagation of these harmful myths have served the mainstream culture well. For instance, the Mammy suggests that it is almost second nature for black females to feel a maternal instinct towards Caucasian babies.

As for the source of the Jezebel, black women had no control over their own bodies during slavery given that they were being auctioned off and bred to maximize profits. Nonetheless, it was in the interest of plantation owners to propagate the lie that sisters were sluts inclined to mate indiscriminately.

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The White Masters of the World

From The World and Africa, 1965

By W. E. B. Du Bois

W. E. B. Du Bois’ Arraignment and Indictment of White Civilization (Fletcher)

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Ancient African Nations

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Negro Digest / Black World

Browse all issues

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Enjoy!

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The Death of Emmett Till by Bob Dylan  The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll  Only a Pawn in Their Game

Rev. Jesse Lee Peterson Thanks America for Slavery /

George Jackson  / Hurricane Carter

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The Journal of Negro History issues at Project Gutenberg

The Haitian Declaration of Independence 1804  / January 1, 1804 — The Founding of Haiti 

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update 3 July 2008 

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Related files:  The Fourth World and the Marxists  Paris Is Burning  Lessons from France   Letters from Young Activists  The Venezuelan Revolution   Responses to Jean Baudrillard   

The Fourth World: In the Belly of the Beast    Big Easy Blues  New Orleans: The American Nightmare   Black Middle Class and a Party for the Poor  The Day the Devil Has Won

 

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