Articles

CAN A WHITE WOMAN DO THIS

CAN A WHITE WOMAN DO THIS

CAN SHE / CARRY YOUR LOAD / TAKE THE HIGH ROAD

UNDERSTAND / RAISE YOUR SONS TO BE A MAN

COOK LIKE YOUR MAMA / DEAL WITH YOUR DRAMA

SACRIFICE / AND NOT THINK TWICE?

 

CAN A WHITE WOMAN DO THIS?
By Jennifer Brown Banks

STAY STRONG

WHEN YOU ROAM

MAKE A HOUSE INTO A HOME

RAISE HELL

RAISE BAIL

RAISE YOUR SPIRITS

WHEN YOU FAIL

BE YOUR LOVER

BE YOUR MOTHER

KEEP YOUR SINS UNDERCOVER

GO TO WORK

GO TO WAR

WITHOUT WORDS

KNOW THE SCORE

SQUEEZE A DOLLAR

TII IT HOLLERS

LOVE YOU

LET YOU

FEEL YOU

GET YOU

GO THROUGH

MAINTAIN

KEEP YOU SATISFIED AND SANE

HEAL YOUR PAIN

SLAVE FOR YOUR GAIN

AND ALL THE WHILE NOT COMPLAIN?

 

CAN SHE

CARRY YOUR LOAD

TAKE THE HIGH ROAD

UNDERSTAND

RAISE YOUR SONS TO BE A MAN

COOK LIKE YOUR MAMA

DEAL WITH YOUR DRAMA

SACRIFICE

AND NOT THINK TWICE?

 

CAN SHE

LOOK GOOD

SURVIVE THE HOOD

JUGGLE THE BILLS

KEEP IT REAL

KNOW THE DEAL

AND BE FAITHFUL STILL . . .

CAN A WHITE WOMAN DO THIS?

© 2005 Jennifer Brown Banks

posted 6 July 2006

Jennifer Brown Banks—Writer/Author/Poet/Consultant—is a Chicago based writer, poet and speaker. Since 1995, she has written for Being Single Magazine, providing insightful articles and commentary to empower women and support singles in living quality, full lives.  As an award winning poet and president and founder of Poets United to Advance the Arts, she has conducted poetry readings and instructional workshops for writers and performing artists. http://www.writergazette.com/jenniferbrownbanks.shtml / jenniferwriter@yahoo.com

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Salvage the Bones

A Novel by Jesmyn Ward

On one level, Salvage the Bones is a simple story about a poor black family that’s about to be trashed by one of the most deadly hurricanes in U.S. history. What makes the novel so powerful, though, is the way Ward winds private passions with that menace gathering force out in the Gulf of Mexico. Without a hint of pretension, in the simple lives of these poor people living among chickens and abandoned cars, she evokes the tenacious love and desperation of classical tragedy. The force that pushes back against Katrina’s inexorable winds is the voice of Ward’s narrator, a 14-year-old girl named Esch, the only daughter among four siblings. Precocious, passionate and sensitive, she speaks almost entirely in phrases soaked in her family’s raw land. Everything here is gritty, loamy and alive, as though the very soil were animated. Her brother’s “blood smells like wet hot earth after summer rain. . . . His scalp looks like fresh turned dirt.” Her father’s hands “are like gravel,” while her own hand “slides through his grip like a wet fish,” and a handsome boy’s “muscles jabbered like chickens.” Admittedly, Ward can push so hard on this simile-obsessed style that her paragraphs risk sounding like a compost heap, but this isn’t usually just metaphor for metaphor’s sake. She conveys something fundamental about Esch’s fluid state of mind: her figurative sense of the world in which all things correspond and connect. She and her brothers live in a ramshackle house steeped in grief since their mother died giving birth to her last child. . . . What remains, what’s salvaged, is something indomitable in these tough siblings, the strength of their love, the permanence of their devotion.—WashingtonPost

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Incognegro: A Memoir of Exile and Apartheid

By  Frank B. Wilderson, III

Wilderson, a professor, writer and filmmaker from the Midwest, presents a gripping account of his role in the downfall of South African apartheid as one of only two black Americans in the African National Congress (ANC). After marrying a South African law student, Wilderson reluctantly returns with her to South Africa in the early 1990s, where he teaches Johannesburg and Soweto students, and soon joins the military wing of the ANC. Wilderson’s stinging portrait of Nelson Mandela as a petulant elder eager to accommodate his white countrymen will jolt readers who’ve accepted the reverential treatment usually accorded him. After the assassination of Mandela’s rival, South African Communist Party leader Chris Hani, Mandela’s regime deems Wilderson’s public questions a threat to national security; soon, having lost his stomach for the cause, he returns to America. Wilderson has a distinct, powerful voice and a strong story that shuffles between the indignities of Johannesburg life and his early years in Minneapolis, the precocious child of academics who barely tolerate his emerging political consciousness. Wilderson’s observations about love within and across the color line and cultural divides are as provocative as his politics; despite some distracting digressions, this is a riveting memoir of apartheid’s last days.—Publishers Weekly

update 26 December 2011

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